~ Illuminati News ~

  Site Map
  Read First!!!
  News & Updates
  US Constitution
  The Illuminati
  Secret Societies
  New World Order
  Banking & Paper Money
  Technology & Science
  Media Control
  UFOs & Aliens
  Mind Control
  Art & Mind Control
  War on Terrorism

Manmade and Natural Disasters


Religions & Religious Wars

  Wars Towards a New World Order
  Government Patents To Control Us
  Spiritual Solutions
  Articles by Wes Penre
  Guest  Writers
  Video & Audio Room
  Website on CD-ROM
  Copyright Fair Use
  Site Search
  Contact Webmaster

Last Updated:
Saturday, October 14, 2006 11:11:38 AM

Saturday, October 14, 2006

Sending Secret Messages Over Public Internet Lines Can Take Place With New Technique   

Last Updated: Saturday, October 14, 2006 11:11:38 AM

Bernard Wu
Bernard Wu


 new technique sends secret messages under other people's noses so cleverly that it would impress James Bond--yet the procedure is so firmly rooted in the real world that it can be instantly used with existing equipment and infrastructure.  

Evgenii Narimanov
Evgenii Narimanov


At this week's annual meeting of the Optical Society of America in Rochester, N.Y., Bernard Wu and Evgenii Narimanov of Princeton University will present a method for transmitting secret messages over existing public fiber-optic networks, such as those operated by Internet service providers. This technique could immediately allow inexpensive, widespread, and secure transmission of confidential and sensitive data by governments and businesses.

Wu and Narimanov's technique is not the usual form of encryption, in which computer software scrambles a message. Instead, it's a more hardware-oriented form of encryption--it uses the real-world properties of an optical-fiber network to cloak a message. The sender transmits an optical signal that is so faint that it is very hard to detect, let alone decode.

The method takes advantage of the fact that real-world fiber-optics systems inevitably have low levels of "noise," random jitters in the light waves that transmit information through the network. The new technique hides the secret message in this optical noise.

In the technique, the sender first translates the secret message into an ultrashort pulse of light. Then, a commercially available optical device (called an optical CDMA encoder) spreads the intense, short pulse into a long, faint stream of optical data, so that the optical message is fainter than the noisy jitters in the fiber-optic network. The intended recipient decodes the message by employing information on how the secret message was originally spread out and using an optical device to compress the message back to its original state. The method is very secure: even if eavesdroppers knew a secret transmission was taking place, any slight imperfection in their knowledge of how the secret signal was spread out would make it too hard to pick out amidst the more intense public signal.

Although the researchers have made public this transmission scheme, and the components for carrying it out are all available, lead author Bernard Wu does not think this technique is being used yet.

"As the method uses optical CDMA technology, which is still undergoing significant research, I don't think any government or corporation is implementing this technique yet," Wu says.

While Wu foresees that government and businesses would have the greatest use for this technique, consumer applications are possible, he says. For example, consumers may occasionally transmit sensitive data via fiber-optic lines for a banking transaction. "This would not be a primary transmission scheme one would employ 24/7, as the price for enhanced security is a lower transmission rate," says Wu. Yet, since consumers send encrypted information to banks only intermittently, "the stealth method is practical" for that purpose, he says.

For more details, see article:

"A method for secure communications over a public fiber-optical network," Bernard B. Wu and Evgenii E. Narimanov, published in Optics Express, Vol. 14, Issue 9, pp. 3738-3751, full text at http://www.opticsexpress.org/abstract.cfm?id=89578

Source: Optical Society of America


Source: http://www.physorg.com/news79715127.html

This page may contain copyrighted material, the use of which has not always been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. I am making such material available in my efforts to advance understanding of environmental, political, human rights, economic, democracy, scientific, and social justice issues, etc. I believe this constitutes a 'fair use' of any such copyrighted material as provided for in section 107 of the US Copyright Law. In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, the material on this site is distributed without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes.

- - - - - - - -
- - - - - - - -


Design downloaded from FreeWebTemplates.com
Free web design, web templates, web layouts, and website resources!